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Assessment of Alcohol Taxation, Affordability and Price Elasticity Patterns in India
The broad objective of the project is to estimate overall tax burden and elasticity of alcohol products for the last 10 years in 7 selected states (Delhi, MP, Sikkim, Maharashtra, Bihar, Karnataka, Himachal Pradesh) of India. To attain this goal, the research study involves undertaking the specific tasks: Reviewing of the state wise price mechanisms and structure of taxation across various types of alcohol products; Estimating the trend in sales, consumption, and affordability of different alcohol products for the last 10 years; Examining the price and tax elasticity of different alcohol products segregated by geography and socio-economic status; Estimating the cross-price elasticity between alcohol products; Analyze state wise increase in revenue in relation with increase in taxation for last 10 years; and, Provide an estimated incremental tax requirement for relative reduction in consumption of alcohol by 10 % by 2025.

Water-to-Cloud: Correlating socio-economic indicators with river water quality
The Ganga River basin spreaded across multiple states of India is the world’s most populous river basin. But, the pressure of industrialization and urbanisation makes the basin vulnerable to incessant outpouring of sewage and large volumes of solid and industrial wastes. While there are studies to show the effect of drinking water on human health, there is a need to address the issue of socio-economic indicators’ correlations with surface water pollution and study the causality therein. The primary aim of the project is to study the socio-economic and livelihood implications of Ganga river water pollution by correlating the real time pollution parameters with self-reported livelihood measures. The two groups chosen for survey are fisherman and households in West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh respectively. The specific objectives of the study are: 1. To understand the effect of water pollution on the livelihood of fishermen. 2. To calculate the direct and indirect health costs of households associated with Ganga river water usage.

Studies on lmpact of BS Vl and Ethanol Blending on Human Health lndex
According to a recently published report of the Indian Council of Medical Research, air pollution accounted for 12.4 lakhs deaths in India in 2017 which included 6.7 lakhs deaths due to outdoor air pollution. The report also stated that average life expectancy in India would have been 1.7 years higher if air pollution levels were within permissible limits. In India, special efforts thus have been made by Government of India to reduce ground level air pollution (transport sector) by leapfrogging with implementation of BS IV to BS VI from 2020. The aim is to reduce the adverse impacts of fuel related particulate matter (PM) from the city of Delhi. The project in partnership with the Maulana Azad Medical College and Indian Oil Corporation Limited, R&D Centre have the specific objectives: a) To generate data on air borne pollutants by deploying air quality monitoring van. ; b) To collect clinical and biometric information of individuals exposed to air pollution. ; c) To study the effect and severity of pollutants on human health.

Research and Estimation of Macroeconomic Logistics costs
High Logistics Costs in India compared to countries with similar environment & state of development are matter of concern for manufacturing growth and comprehensive development of the country. Several reasons are often cited for high logistics costs namely, unfavourable policy regime, lack of multimodal transport system (heavy reliance on road transport), fragmented Storage infrastructure, presence of multiple stakeholders in the entire transport and storage value chain, poor quality of road and port infrastructure, and the absence of technology intervention at storage/transportation and distribution activities. The high cost of logistics affects the country’s competiveness in export and domestic markets. It is important to estimate overall logistics costs, including its various components/elements, so as to understand where problem are and the corresponding solutions. To meet the overall objective of understanding the cost of undertaking logistics in India, Logistics Division, Ministry of Commerce, has commissioned NCAER to undertake interlinked studies with the following objectives: (a) Cost analysis of cargo movement on major routes (Route Study); (b) Estimation of Macroeconomic logistics cost; and (c) A Policy Roundtable among stake-holders

Agricultural Diagnostic for Bihar State of India
This NCAER study is aimed at undertaking a diagnostic of the agricultural sector to help inform and operationalise the Government of Bihar vision for agriculture in the next 5 years. The study will (a) assess the drivers of agricultural productivity and growth in Bihar; (b) assess and rank the obstacles to inclusive growth; (c) identify actions to increase this sector’s productivity and promote inclusive growth to help this sector move to a sustained higher-growth path. The policy recommendations of this diagnostic will help policy makers, donors and other stakeholders to the success of Bihar’s agricultural sector enhance the decisions they make on policies and programmes to deliver inclusive growth of this sector and greater food security for the state of Bihar. Aligned with the Bihar Agriculture Road Map of the Government of Bihar, the purpose of this study is also to develop practical, evidence-based policy options to support sustainable growth in this sector.  

Doubling Farmer's Income
The Government of India has focused its attention on doubling the farmers’ income during the seven-year period from 2015–16 to 2022–23, marking a significant departure from past policies when the emphasis had been only on production rather than the marketability of the produce. In order to provide analytics for this focus, a Committee on Doubling Farmers’ Income was constituted in April 2016 under the chairmanship of Dr Ashok Dalwai, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare. The Committee has adopted three institutes as its knowledge partners. While the National Council of Applied Economic Research (NCAER) is one of them, the other two are the National Institute of Agricultural Research Policy (NIAP), and the National Centre for Cold Chain Development (NCCD). The DFI Committee has held multiple consultations with stakeholders across the country and has co-opted more than 100 resource persons to help it in drafting the Report. These members have been drawn from among researchers, academics, non-government organisations, farmers’ organisations, professional associations, trade, industry, commerce, consultancy bodies, policymakers at the Central and State levels, and many others with various domain strengths. While thirteen volumes of the DFI Committee Report have already been prepared, Volume XIV on the Comprehensive Policy Recommendations of the DFI Committee is in the process of finalisation. The Committee has identified six major sources for increasing farmers’ income, viz., improvement in crop productivity, livestock productivity, resource use efficiency or promoting savings in the cost of production, increase in cropping intensity, diversification towards high-value crops, and enhancement of the real prices received by farmers. With the DFI strategy focusing on doubling the farmers’ income, all those associated with the programme at both the Central and State levels need to disaggregate the interventions for achieving a higher share of farm income in the farmers’ cumulative income. Hence, it has been targeted to change the ratio of farm to non-farm income from the existing 60: 40 (in 2015–16) to 70: 30 (by 2022–23), which would ensure greater viability for farming.

Implement Digital Direct Benefit Transfers: A DBT Readiness Index for the States of India
Both the central and state governments in India operate a vast array of cash and in-kind transfers to protect its poor. But these social protection schemes often suffer from substantial leakages and poor targeting, distort market functioning by subsidising prices and thereby impose significant fiscal stress without commensurate social benefits. India is seeking to port these subsidies into direct-to-beneficiary transfers, often called Direct Benefit Transfers or DBT. Implementing DBT should be a means to an end, not only to reduce leakages in the Indian subsidy system, but also to ensure that the targeted poor and vulnerable in society get timely transfers at low cost in time and money. In the Indian context DBT readiness is the ability of states/UTs to pursue government to citizen (G2C) and government to bank/business solutions through the use of Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) viz. electronic transfer of cash or in-kind benefits from government to citizen or for effecting cashless in- kind transfers. Accurate targeting of beneficiaries due to Aadhar and biometric verification makes it feasible to avoid leakages due to ghost beneficiaries and to avoid leakages due to duplication errors . The DBT-Readiness of all Indian states and Union Territories (UTs) will be assessed both annually and quarterly by National Council of Applied Economic Research (NCAER) over the next three years starting from 2016 to 2018 based on annual surveys. The quarterly assessment will be based off a combination of primary and secondary data available or made available by state/UT governments. States/UTs will be ranked relatively using the annual surveys. The quarterly rankings will be based off absolute index, which will help track states/UTs their own growth over time. In addition to the overall DBT assessment of states and UTs, this survey undertakes DBT Readiness of 10 Central Schemes.

NCAER Labour Economics Research Observatory (N-LERO) and New Skills at Work India
India has one of the world’s youngest populations and one million job-seekers will join India’s labour force every month for the next 20 years. India urgently needs to meet its 3E challenge of education, employability, and employment if it is to reap the demographic dividend. How India’s youth are trained and skilled will determine their readiness to be productive in the jobs of today and tomorrow. Against this background, through this first research initiative in its new Labour Economics Research Observatory (LERO), NCAER will examine the 3E chain in India, focusing on both the supply and demand for skills using a combination of analytics and surveys. Supported by J.P. Morgan, this twoyear research programme will engage key stakeholders from government, industry and skills training providers through a research advisory committee and convening; and as a research program will have the potential to contribute both to policy as well as practice pertaining to employability, labour markets and the skilling supply chain. The research will take a 360 degree perspective of the complex skilling environment to not only look at employability but also youth aspirations, employer requirements and interest, related policies as well as how s ills ties into India’s education system.

Human Development in India (IHDS-I and II)
India Human Development Surveys I (2004-5) and II (2011-12) (IHDS-I and II) form part of a collaborative research program between researchers from the National Council of Applied Economic Research and the University of Maryland. The goal of this program is to document changes in the daily lives of Indian households in a society undergoing rapid transition.

Analysis of Value of Urban Land Based on Trends and Patterns in the prices of land
The underlying rationale of the study is to identify the determinants of land values in the NCT of Delhi. The study, apart from using standard statistical tools, would undertake several case studies to develop a better understanding of the determinants of spatial and inter-temporal variations of land values.

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